Education Quotations

 

What does education often do? It makes a straight-cut ditch of a free, meandering brook.—Journal, 31 October 1850
Knowledge does not come to us by details but by lieferungs from the gods.—Journal, 7 July 1851
Knowledge does not come to us by details, but in flashes of light from heaven.—"Life without Principle"
Many College text books which were a weariness & a stumbling block when studied I have since read a little in with pleasure & profit.—Journal, 19 February 1854
It is strange that men are in such a haste to get fame as teachers rather than knowledge as learners.—Journal, 11 March 1856
Who knows whence his education is to come!—The Correspondence of Henry David Thoreau
It is only when we forget all our learning that we begin to know.—Journal, 4 October 1859
It is only when we forget all our learning that we begin to know.—Journal, 4 October 1859
Many college text-books, which were a weariness and a stumbling-block to me when studied, I have since read a little in with pleasure and profit.—Journal, 19 February 1854
Perhaps I should give some account of myself. I would make education a pleasant thing both to the teacher and the scholar. This discipline, which we allow to be the end of life, should not be one thing in the schoolroom, and another in the street. We should seek to be fellow students with the pupil, and should learn of, as well as with him, if we would be most helpful to him. But I am not blind to the difficulties of the case; it supposes a degree of freedom which rarely exists. It hath not entered into the heart of man to conceive the full import of that word — Freedom — not a paltry Republican freedom, with a posse comitatus at his heels to administer it in doses as to a sick child — but a freedom proportionate to the dignity of his nature — a freedom that shall make him feel that he is a man among men, and responsible only to that Reason of which he is a particle, for his thoughts and his actions.—Thoreau to Orestes Brownson, 30 December 1837
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