Upcoming Events and Event Catalog

Our Event Catalog provides general information about our recurring programs

Reading Circle February 2020

Wednesday, February 26, 2020
7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Event Details & Registration

Walden Woods Project, Lincoln MA

Directions

The Walden Woods Project invites you to join us for our new Reading Circle! Open to the public, we will read and explore works by Thoreau as well as authors whose work contributes to an even deeper examination of Thoreau’s ideas.

At our first Reading Circle, on February 26, we will discuss:

  • “Civil Disobedience,” by Henry David Thoreau
  • “Slavery in Massachusetts,” by Henry David Thoreau
  • “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

We will have some questions prepared to start the discussion and also encourage participants to bring their own!  Walden Woods Project Curator of Collections and Thoreau scholar Jeff Cramer will join us to provide biographical and historical context to the conversation.

We will begin at 7 PM and finish by 8:30 PM. Wine, refreshments, and non-alcoholic drinks will be offered.

We have had so many pre-registrations for the Reading Circle that we are closing registration and starting a wait list!  We are sorry to limit the number of participants, but feel it is necessary in order to have a productive, in-depth discussion at the Reading Circle.

 

 


Aurea Ensemble, Of Nature Composed

Thursday, March 5, 2020
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Event Details & Registration

The Walden Woods Project, Lincoln Massachusetts

Directions

The Walden Woods Project invites you to a special musical performance!

Aurea Ensemble

“Of Nature Composed”

Thursday, March 5, 2020

7:00 PM (Doors open at 6:30 PM; wine and cheese reception will follow)

FREE, but pre-registration is required

 

The Aurea Ensemble will perform “Of Nature Composed,” which explores the intersection of nature, science, the arts and humanities, and the sanctity of our environment. “Of Nature Composed” includes the words and music of 2014 Pulitzer Prize winner John Luther Adams; American composers Charles Griffes, John Cage, Lou Harrison, and Charles Ives; with words of naturalist Henry David Thoreau, American contemporary Pulitzer Prize winning poet Galway Kinnell, and Ted Kooser.

The piece was created in 2016 for the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities in celebration of the centennial of the Pulitzer Prize. The mission of Aurea is to investigate and invigorate the relationship between music and the spoken word. Aurea aspires to unify the humanities and fine arts in dynamic, accessible & engaging ways through performance and educational outreach.

The Aurea Ensemble features:

Nigel Gore, spoken word

Chris Turner, harmonica, spoken word

Katherine Winterstein and Alexey Shabalin, violins

Consuelo Sherba, viola

Emmanuel Feldman, cello

 

Click here for more information about the Aurea Ensemble and “Of Nature Composed.”


Vernal Pool Walk 2020

Sunday, April 26, 2020
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Event Details & Registration

Lincoln Center parking lot, Lincoln MA

Directions

 

Join the Walden Woods Project and the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust as we explore a large vernal pool and the surrounding woods with Matt Burne, Vice-President of the Vernal Pool Association and co-author of A Field Guide to the Animals of Vernal Pools.

This walk is FREE and open to all ages. SPACE IS LIMITED, so pre-registration is required.

With questions or for information:  Send a message to Whitney Retallic, Walden Woods Project’s Director of Education.

 


Note: Professional development events for educators can be found on the educator event page


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Public Program Catalog

These events are offered on an on-going basis. When an event is scheduled, it will appear in the list of upcoming event at the top of this page.

Stewardship Lectures

The Walden Woods Project’s Thoreau Institute sponsors the Stewardship Lecture Series to celebrate innovation and creativity in environmental stewardship and to highlight the work of those who are promoting the values and ideas embodied by Thoreau. Each year the series features a number of talks, panel discussions, or media presentations featuring individuals at the cutting edge of a renewed environmental and social justice movement.

Recent Stewardship Lectures include:

  • Terry Tempest Williams, on her book The Hours of Land: A Personal Topography of American National Parks.
  • Laura Dassow Walls, in October 2016, gave the first public presentation of her biography, Henry David Thoreau: A Life, due out on July 12, 2017
  • David Gessner, All the Wild that Remains: Edward Abbey, Wallace Stegner, and the American West (on his book of the same title)
  • Robert M. Thorson, Walden’s Shore: Henry David Thoreau and Nineteenth Century Science (on his book of the same title)

 

We are always seeking excellent candidates for the lecture series and welcome any nominations and suggestions for the upcoming year. If you have an idea for a topic or presenter for our Stewardship Lecture Series, please contact the Walden Woods Project.

Modern Lyceum

“Thoreau’s Legacy: A Modern Lyceum” brings back the movement that spawned adult education in America with public forums that promoted thoughtful conversation and education about the social, intellectual and ethical questions of 19th-Century society. Guided by accomplished scholars on related topics, our Modern Lyceum will engage the public in an investigation of current social issues, with respect to and through the lens of Henry David Thoreau’s still-poignant writings and actions—incorporating many of his contemporaries.

Our Lyceum events will not seek to provide easy answers to today’s dilemmas and debates, but to highlight the way in which the voices and perspectives of the past can shed light on and help us to critically examine our current situation. We anticipate that our panelists will—all drawing from Thoreau’s texts and actions—come to slightly different conclusions to some very complex questions, and by doing so, broaden our perspectives on events of today.

Read more about Henry David Thoreau’s involvement with the 19th-Century Lyceum Movement in the United States.