Walking Quotations

 

I walk out into a nature such as the old prophets and poets Menu, Moses, Homer, Chaucer, walked in. You may name it America, but it is not America. Neither Americus Vespucius, nor Columbus, nor the rest were the discoverers of it. There is a truer account of it in Mythology than in any history of America so called that I have seen.—"Walking"
I am alarmed when it happens that I have walked a mile into the woods bodily, without getting there in spirit.—"Walking"
If you are ready to leave father and mother, and brother and sister, and wife and child and friends, and never see them again,—if you have paid your debts, and made your will, and settled all your affairs, and are a free man, then you are ready for a walk.—"Walking"
In my afternoon walk I would fain forget all my morning occupations and my obligations to society.—"Walking"
In my walks I would fain return to my senses.—"Walking"
In our most trivial walks, we are constantly, though unconsciously, steering like pilots by certain well-known beacons and headlands, and if we go beyond our usual course we still carry in our minds the bearing of some neighboring cape; and not till we are completely lost, or turned round,— for a man needs only to be turned round once with his eyes shut in this world to be lost, — do we appreciate the vastness and strangeness of nature.—Walden
In the night the eyes are partly closed or retire into the head. Other senses take the lead. The walker is guided as well by the sense of smell. Every plant and field and forest emits its odor now, swamp-pink in the meadow and tansy in the road; and there is the peculiar dry scent of corn which has begun to show its tassels.—Cape Cod
It is a great art to saunter.—Journal, 26 April 1841
It is a regular spring rain, such as I remember walking in,—windy but warm.—Journal12 March 1859
Many men walk by day, few walk by night. It is a very different season.—Journal, 1 July 1850
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