Landscape Quotations

 

In reality, history fluctuates as the face of the landscape from morning to evening. What is of moment is its hue and color. Time hides no treasures; we want not its then, but its now. We do not complain that the mountains in the horizon are blue and indistinct; they are the more like the heavens. — A Week on the Concord and Merrimack RiversA Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers
Man's progress through nature should have an accompaniment of music. It relieves the scenery, which is seen through it as a subtler element, like a very clear morning air in autumn. — Journal, 8 January 1842—Journal, 8 January 1842
Music wafts me through the clear, sultry valleys, with only a slight gray vapor against the hills. — Journal, 8 January 1842—Journal, 8 January 1842
Perchance, in the afternoon of such a day, when the water is perfectly calm and full of reflections, I paddle gently down the main stream, and, turning up the Assabet, reach a quiet cove, where I unexpectedly find myself surrounded by myriads of leaves, like fellow-voyagers, which seem to have the same purpose, or want of purpose, with myself. — "Autumnal Tints"—"Autumnal Tints"
Sky water. It needs no fence. Nations come and go without defiling it. It is a mirror which no stone can crack, whose quicksilver will never wear off, whose gilding Nature continually repairs. — WaldenWalden
The forest looked like a firm grass sward, and the effect of these lakes in its midst has been well compared, by one who has since visited this same spot, to that of a "mirror broken into a thousand fragments, and wildly scattered over the grass, reflecting the full blaze of the sun." — The Maine WoodsThe Maine Woods
The land seemed to grow fairer as we withdrew from it. — A Week on the Concord and Merrimack RiversA Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers
The trees now in the rain look heavy and rich all day, as commonly at twilight, drooping with the weight of wet leaves. — Journal, 17 July 1852—Journal, 17 July 1852
They appeared to lie by magic on the side of the vale, like a mirror left in a slanting position. — Cape CodCape Cod
Thus a man shall lead his life away from here on the edge of the wilderness, in Indian Millinocket stream, in a new world, far in the dark of a continent, and have a flute to play at evening here, while his strains echo to the stars, amid the howling of wolves; shall live, as it were, in the primitive age of the world, a primitive man. — The Maine WoodsThe Maine Woods
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